Page 1: Project background

Logos of participating institutions

We are proposing to build an online community of practice, repository of teaching/learning materials and database of experts/expertise specifically dedicated to interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teaching and learning in energy. This survey is to gauge feedback from the wider community to help steer the direction of this community of practice. The soft deadline for survey responses is Friday the 14th of December.

We welcome input and membership from across the energy field from people with a diverse range of experience including industry, policy makers, third sector as well as researchers, lecturers, module leaders and managers of education programmes.

We are not aware of a network like this at the moment - and believe that encouraging a multi-disciplinary environment for learners who will be involved in changing energy systems around the world is important.

We would therefore be very grateful if you could take the time (10-15 minutes) to undertake the survey - or perhaps even email any thoughts to Dr Grant Wilson at: i.a.g.wilson@bham.ac.uk

The survey is comprised of 10 questions, divided in the following pages:

  • About you
  • About your teaching and learning experience
  • What works as an online community of practice?
  • Access and contribution of information / content through the community of practice
  • About a multidisciplinary energy teaching and learning workshop

The Whole Systems Energy – Sustainability and Energy Education Network (WSE – SEEN) is a collaboration between the Universities of Birmingham (Dr Grant Wilson, Dr Claudia Favero, Omar Saeed), Manchester (Dr Carly McLachlan), Edinburgh (Dr Dan Van der Horst) and Leeds (Dr Catherine Bale)

The project is funded through the UK Energy Research Centre's Whole Systems Networking Fund.

We have used onlinesurveys through JISC as a secure environment for the survey data. In order to adhere to EPSRC’s expectations for data management, we will ensure that data is securely preserved for a minimum of 10 years from the "date that any researcher ‘privileged access’ period expires or, if others have accessed the data, from last date on which access to the data was requested by a third party" and that "all reasonable steps will be taken to ensure that publicly-funded data is not held in any jurisdiction where the available legal safeguards provide lower levels of protection than are available in the UK"